Wedding Invitation Wording

A Hidden Gem

Invitation wording, a question I get asked at every consultation

Your wedding invitations are actually one of the most important elements of your day. It might seem like a tiny detail in the scheme of things, but your invitation is essentially the very first point of contact you have with your guests. It will set the tone for the entire wedding, whether it’s a black-tie affair or a backyard gathering.

Importantly, it also contains all of the crucial information your guests will need to make sure they get to your wedding on time, in the right location, and prepared for whatever the day and night will bring! Before you even think about putting pen to paper, it is important to take some time to consider your wedding invitation etiquette. 

This is a little post to hopefully guide you to your perfect invitation.

What needs to be included.

No matter how pretty your invitations might look, your number one priority should be making sure all of the vital details are outlined clearly. From the who to the when I call it the four ‘W’s’; Who, What, Where and When.

The ‘Who’

This is the most obvious bit! It needs to have your names, always include your surnames to limit confusion. Are you going to have personalised invitations? If you are then you need to think about how to address your guests. When it comes to addressing your guests, it’s up to you whether you include surnames, titles or nicknames. For couples who are married or in a long-term relationship, make sure you address the invitation to both guests.

When thinking about the ‘Who’ you also need to think about children, some parents may automatically assume that kids are welcome unless you specifically mention otherwise. Because it only applies to a certain number of guests, don’t feel like you need to make a sweeping statement of ‘no kids allowed’ across all invitations! Why not have a little chat with your friends and family who have children and explain informally that you are not having children attend they will probably appreciate this.

The ‘Where’

Unless you want guests turning up to your ceremony 20 minutes late because of an incorrect address, make sure you clearly outline where the wedding is going to be! The address of your ceremony should be first. If the reception is at the same location then you can simply state “reception to follow”.

If your ceremony and reception are at different locations, make sure you give the addresses of both. Guests will also need to know whether transport between locations has been organised, or if arrangements need to be made.

For venues that might be off the beaten track or a little trickier to find, directions to the location might also be helpful and appreciated by your guests. I create bespoke maps for my Pastel Brides. The most important thing to remember is typos! you must double check everything, the wrong postcode or misspelt address could cause havoc!

The ‘When’

Clearly stating the correct timings for your guests on your wedding invitations will be crucial to the logistics of your day. When it comes to the arrival of your guests, it’s generally recommended to have them arrive at the ceremony venue around 30 minutes before you walk down the aisle. This will allow enough time for elderly guests to get seated and comfortable and the groom to ‘welcome’ and greet everyone. It should also cover any last minute issues like traffic, or those guests who may be notorious for running late (we all know one of them)!

Also, to accompany the arrival time, your invitation should also specify what time the reception is going to finish. Thinking of noise restrictions and staffing, most venues are generally quite strict on ushering guests out of the venue by a certain time. Give your guests a firm time on exactly when things will be wrapping up, so that they can organise transport to get them home or what to tell the babysitter.

It is good to remember you will also need to include an RSVP date on your invitation for guests to confirm or decline their presence. If you don’t specify your RSVP date then you might be setting yourself up for last minute surprises or panicking over how many meals to order. With the caterer in mind, you need to give them at least three weeks notice may be more but they will be able to confirm this with you.

The ‘What’

Attending a wedding requires preparation, give your guests a good idea on what they should be expecting for your big day. There is nothing worse than feeling either overdressed or underdressed at a wedding. Make this obvious to your guests at the very beginning through your invitation!

Are you hosting a glamorous, five-course degustation dinner in a private ballroom? You should definitely specify that the dress code is strictly black-tie. On the flipside, if you’re planning a super casual picnic in the park then let guests know to dress low-key and comfortable.

I have mentioned in a previous post that a friend went to a wedding invitation on a homemade printer invitation and thought the wedding wasn’t going to be anything special so dressed accordingly, they were totally embarrassed when they arrived to find a totally different affair! The more information you can supply for your guests the better, they can then feel relaxed on the day and truly enjoy every moment of it with you.

 

 

 

 

A Hidden Gem

Optional information to include on your wedding invitations.

With couples living together first they might have completely kitted out their home. Therefore a wedding list maybe not needed so how about a little poem for money towards the honeymoon instead?

With social media being ever present in our daily lives you might want to include a hashtag, this could be used then from the off, from receiving the invitation to the stag/hen do’s and even on the day memories.

Another very important thing to add is dietary requirements this could be essential as there are so many things to keep in consideration with allergies and preferences. I find adding this to the RSVP card is the perfect place for both you and your guests.

Below are a few options that could be adapted for your wedding invitations. However, if you want to become a Pastel bride please contact me and I would gladly work with you to design the perfect bespoke wedding invitation for your theme.

 

FORMAL | IN A CHURCH

MR. AND MRS. CHRISTIAN THOMAS
REQUEST THE HONOUR OF YOUR PRESENCE
AT THE MARRIAGE OF THEIR DAUGHTER

JANE LOUISE
TO
LIAM SMITH

SATURDAY, THE FOURTEENTH OF MAY
TWENTY NINETEEN
AT SIX O’CLOCK IN THE EVENING

SHERBORNE ABBEY
SHERBORNE, DORSET

RECEPTION TO FOLLOW
AT THE GRANGE OBORNE 

SEMI-FORMAL | BOTH FAMILIES INVOLVED

MR. AND MRS. CHRISTIAN THOMAS
AND MR. AND MRS. STEVE SMITH
INVITE YOU TO SHARE IN THEIR JOY
AT THE WEDDING CELEBRATION OF THEIR CHILDREN

JANE LOUISE
TO
LIAM SMITH

SATURDAY, THE FOURTEENTH OF MAY
TWENTY NINETEEN
AT SIX O’CLOCK IN THE EVENING

HOLBROOK MANOR, WINCANTON, SOMERSET

FORMAL | NON-CHURCH VENUE

MR. AND MRS. CHRISTIAN THOMAS
REQUEST THE PLEASURE OF YOUR COMPANY
AT THE MARRIAGE OF THEIR DAUGHTER

HELEN ANNE
TO
MARTIN STEVENS

SATURDAY, THE FOURTEENTH OF MAY
TWENTY NINETEEN
AT SIX O’CLOCK IN THE EVENING

SPARKFORD HALL,
SPARKFORD, SOMERSET

 

CASUAL

TOGETHER WITH THEIR FAMILIES

HELEN AND MARTIN

INVITE YOU TO SHARE IN THEIR JOY
AT THE CELEBRATION OF THEIR WEDDING

SATURDAY, THE FOURTEENTH OF MAY
TWENTY NINETEEN
AT SIX O’CLOCK IN THE EVENING

THE OLD MILKING PARLOUR, HENSTRIDGE, SOMERSET